Getting Kids to Wear Glasses

Image of kids wearing glasses.

In most of North America, optometrists are known as Doctors of Optometry (D.O.). As physicians, they are able to diagnose eye disease and prescribe medications or corrective lenses. Licensure as a DO requires a Bachelor's Degree and successful completion of a four-year school of optometrics.

Educational specialists, Allen and Virginia Crane, point out in their book "Buzzards to Bluebirds: Improve Your Child's Learning and Behavior in Six Weeks," all optometrists receive extensive education in:

• The detection of eye disease;

• Examination of binocular vision and convergence;

• Fitting eyeglasses and contact lenses, known scientifically as performing refraction.

While all DO's can treat both children and adults, specialized pediatric optometrists complete postdoctoral studies allowing them to specialize in the evaluation and treatment of children. If your child's optometrist has prescribed eyeglasses to help correct your child's vision, it is of particular importance to their academic and athletic success that they consistently wear their glasses. Why? Because much of your child's schooling requires a minimum degree of visual skills for learning and academic success.

Helping Your Child Adjust to Wearing Glasses

The American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus points out that many children with a diagnosis of myopia, or nearsightedness, are delighted by the vision their new glasses provide upon first use. Children diagnosed with hyperopia (farsightedness) or astigmatisms, however, often take several weeks to adjust to the visual changes introduced by their new eyeglasses. A satisfactory adjustment also depends upon your child's age and the comfort of the eyeglasses. Here are some tips recommended by pediatric health specialists:

• Be positive! Depending upon your child's age, cite specific ways in which improved vision through use of their eyeglasses will improve their life, ranging from coloring better, doing jigsaw puzzles, bird watching with grandpa, or playing Little League baseball.

• If able, allow your child to pick out their eyeglass frames.

• Ensure that the eyeglasses fit your child properly and are comfortable. For instance, most infant and toddler eyeglasses are constructed with "cable temples" that wrap behind the ears. As your child grows, these cables become too short and can cause irritation and discomfort around the ears. Frames can become too narrow for a child’s head causing headaches and sore temples. Another common complaint is reddened areas and discomfort where the nose pieces rest. Schedule regular and frequent check-ups and readjustments to ensure a comfortable fit as your child grows.

• Polycarbonate lenses are lighter for children to wear and safer in the event that the eyeglasses are accidentally broken.

• Purchase replacement insurance on your child's glasses. The additional cost will be more than paid for in the benefits of allowing your child to be physically active and playful without worries that their eyeglasses might break.

• Speak with your child's optometrist about any children's educational material specifically targeted to children -- coloring books, brochures written for children or other items -- available through his or her practice.

Sources:

American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus. “Glasses Fitting for Children.”

American Optometric Association. “Toys, Games, and Your Child’s Vision.”

KidsGrowth Child Health™. “Getting Kids to Wear their Glasses.”

Contact Us

We look forward to hearing from you.

No form settings found. Please configure it.

Hours of Operation

Our Regular Schedule

Monday:

10:00 a.m.

6:00 p.m.

Tuesday:

10:00 a.m.

6:00 p.m.

Wednesday:

10:00 a.m.

6:00 p.m.

Thursday:

10:00 a.m.

6:00 p.m.

Friday:

10:00 a.m.

6:00 p.m.

Saturday:

9:00 a.m.

4:00 p.m.

Sunday:

Closed

Closed

Location

Find us on the map

Testimonials

Reviews From Our Satisfied Patients

  • ""Outstanding!

    Extremely friendly staff from start to finish, and the entire staff is more than willing to take the extra time to explain any questions you might have during your appointment. Also, the doctors are very thorough and make even the most complex medical terms easy to understand.

    Come by and see the difference (pun intended)!""
    Andrew S. -Huntington Beach, CA

Featured Articles

Read up on informative topics

  • Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    One of the leading causes of vision loss in people who are age 50 or older is age-related macular degeneration (AMD). This common eye condition leads to damage of a small spot near the center of the retina called the macula. The macula provides us with the ability to clearly see objects that are straight ...

    Read More
  • Diabetic Eye Diseases

    Diabetes is a condition that involves high blood sugar (glucose) levels. This can affect many parts of the body, including the eyes. One of the most common diabetic eye diseases is diabetic retinopathy, which is also a leading cause of blindness in American adults. Diabetic Retinopathy Diabetic retinopathy ...

    Read More
  • Presbyopia

    Somewhere around the age of 40, most people’s eyes lose the ability to focus on close-up objects. This condition is called presbyopia. You may start holding reading material farther away, because it is blurry up close. Reading suddenly gives you eyestrain. You might wonder when manufacturers started ...

    Read More
  • Laser Cataract Surgery

    The only way to correct the clouded vision caused by advanced cataracts is surgical intervention. If you find yourself pursuing cataract surgery to remove one or both cataract-disease lenses, you may be wondering what surgical approaches are available for treatment. Although eye surgeons have successfully ...

    Read More
  • Cataract Surgery

    With cataract surgery, your ophthalmologist removes the cataract-diseased lens of your eye. The ophthalmologist then replaces your natural lens with an artificial one. The Procedure This outpatient procedure is generally safe and takes less than an hour. Your ophthalmologist will dilate your pupil ...

    Read More
  • Fuchs' Corneal Dystrophy

    Fuchs' dystrophy (pronounced fooks DIS-truh-fee) is an eye disease characterized by degenerative changes to the cornea’s innermost layer of cells. The cause for Fuchs' dystrophy is not fully understood. If your mother or father has the disease, then there is roughly a 50 percent chance that you will ...

    Read More
  • Peripheral Vision Loss

    Normal sight includes central vision (the field of view straight ahead) and peripheral vision (the field of view outside the circle of central vision). The inability to see within a normal range of view often indicates peripheral vision loss. In severe cases of peripheral vision loss, individuals only ...

    Read More
  • Presbyopia

    As we age, our eyes—like the rest of our bodies—begin to lose flexibility and strength. When this happens to the lens of the eye and its surrounding muscles, your lens will become stiff. This makes it harder to see close objects clearly because the eyes can't focus properly. It's a natural part of ...

    Read More
  • Patches

    Eye patches are used to strengthen muscle control in weak eyes. By placing a patch over the strong eye, the weaker eye is forced to do the heavy lifting. While it may be uncomfortable for the patient at first, the muscle controlling the weaker eye will become tougher and more resilient. This will allow ...

    Read More
  • How to Transition Into Different Lighted Situations

    Does it take a little while for your eyes to adjust to the dark? Try a few of these tips. ...

    Read More

Newsletter Sign Up